Special Constabulary

Specials FAQs

 

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1. What powers do Special Constables have?

2. What is the minimum monthly duty requirement?

3. Where will I be stationed?

4. What happens after my initial training?

5. What duties will I perform during my first few months?

6. Can I work with specialist departments?

7. What expenses can I claim?

8. What happens if I am required to attend court?

9. What welfare and support facilities are there?

10. Are there prospects for promotion within the Special Constabulary?

 

1. What powers do Special Constables have?

Special Constables have exactly the same powers as regular officers throughout England and Wales. They wear the same uniform and carry the same officer protection equipment.

 

2. What is the minimum monthly duty requirement?

Generally Special Constables are required to do a minimum of 16 hours a month, however the average undertaken is around 30. Some periods of reduced hours are acceptable if a Special Constable is on their annual holiday, needs study leave for professional examinations or in other extenuating personal circumstances. This flexibility will need to be agreed with a Special Sergeant.


All Special Constables are expected to meet the national minimum requirement of 200 duty hours each year.

 

3. Where will I be stationed?

A map of Hertfordshire

New recruits will initially be allocated to areas of the county where there is more of a demand for Special Constables.  The location you are allocated to could be any one of the areas featured in the map.

 

However, as the Constabulary values the contribution made by Special Constables, it will always endeavour to post officers in areas they would like to be based if possible.  Some officers prefer not to work in the local area they live in, whilst others see that as an advantage. 


New recruits will be allocated to either an Intervention or Safer Neighbourhood Team to which they will remain dedicated for the majority of their duties.  However there will be opportunities to work with other teams and go on developmental attachments to specialist teams and to support other policing events and operations outside of their dedicated teams. In time these attachments could become permanent positions.

 

4. What happens after my initial training?

After initial training, new Special Constable recruits will undertake a period of assessment during the course of their duties. They will undertake these duties with the guidance of a coach and once they have completed the necessary criteria, Special Constables will be deemed fit for independent patrol.

 

5. What duties will I perform during my first few months?

Once your initial training has finished, during the first few months, you will put into practice key policing skills you have learnt such as Stop and Search, arrests and statement taking.  You will work on a variety of incidents as they arise with the support of your coach.  More classroom based learning and practical training will follow throughout your policing career.

 

6. Can I work with specialist departments?

After it has been decided an officer is fit for independent patrol, they can be considered to take on a specialist policing role.

 

7. What expenses can I claim?

You should not be out-of-pocket as a result of being a Special Constable and any expenses are reclaimable. Telephone calls, travel allowance and subsistence allowance (depending on the length of your shift) can be claimed.

 

8. What happens if I am required to attend court?

You will be notified of any case, in which you are required to give evidence, well in advance. You will be reimbursed for any loss of earnings as a result of attending court.

 

9. What welfare and support facilities are there?

The Occupational Health and Welfare Unit at Headquarters offers specialist advice supported by a comprehensive range of services.


The services of Chaplains are available throughout the Constabulary to anyone seeking emotional and spiritual support, regardless of personal faith religion and beliefs.


Hertfordshire Constabulary is committed to representing and maintaining the happiness of its staff in as many ways as possible. We have a diverse workforce, with a wide range of beliefs. Employees are represented through a variety of support groups which include:

 

  • Keystone (Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual Support Group)
  • Christian Police Association
  • enABLE  (Disability Support Group)
  • Engage (Women’s Support Group)
  • Hertfordshire Association of Muslim Police
  • Hertfordshire Black Police Association


Any loss of earnings incurred due to injury on duty will be reimbursed.

 

10. Are there prospects for promotion within the Special Constabulary?

Yes. Vacancies arise throughout the county and are advertised internally.


If you meet the criteria for the post advertised, you can request a promotion application form. Short-listed applicants will be invited to a promotion interview board and you will be supported through the process with appropriate training.