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DVPNs and DVPOs

The aim of a Domestic Violence Protection Notice (DVPN) and Domestic Violence Protection Order (DVPO) is to provide you with immediate protection following an incident of domestic violence and to give you time to consider what to do next. You will be contacted by local specialist services that will provide advice and support in what is available to you.

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What is a DVPN?

A Domestic Violence Protection Notice (DVPN) is a notice served by the police against a person who is aged over 18, where the police reasonably believe that he or she has been violent or has threatened violence against you and that you need to be protected from him or her.

The law allows the police to serve a DVPN on this person even if you do not agree to it.

What does a DVPN do?

A DVPN places certain conditions on the person which may include:

  • stopping him/her from entering, and being within a certain distance, of your home
  • stopping him/her from making you leave or excluding you from your home
  • requiring him/her to leave your home

What happens if we live at the same address?

Then the DVPN requires them to leave immediately. They will be able to take with them possessions that they may need.

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What happens if the person does not follow the conditions of the DVPN?

You should call the police – if it is an emergency call 999.

The person may be arrested, kept in police custody and then brought before a Magistrates’ Court.

A Superintendent will review all of the information and evidence and may decide for your safety that a DVPO should be applied for.

What is a DVPO?

A Domestic Violence Protection Order (DVPO) is an order applied for by the police and made by the Magistrates’ Court.

If an order is made it will last for a minimum of 14 days and a maximum of 28 days.

The order may:

  • stop him/her from entering, and being within a certain distance, of your home
  • stop him/her from making you leave or exclude you from your home
  • require him/her to leave your home

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When will the case go to court?

The Magistrates’ Court will hear an application for a DVPO within 48 hours (excluding Sundays and Bank Holidays) of the person being served with a DVPN by the police.

If he or she does not attend the Magistrates’ Court, then a DVPO can be made in his or her absence.

The law allows the Magistrates to make a DVPO against the person even if you do not agree to it.

In addition, the Magistrates will take into account the welfare of anyone under 18 who the police consider will be affected by the DVPO.

Do I have to go to court?

If you have given us information in your statement which is called upon in court you may have to attend. This is something we would discuss with you.

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