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Hertfordshire domestic abuse case features on ITV crime series

5 Jan 2019
  • Kellie Sutton took her own life in August 2017 aged 30, following months of physical and mental abuse from her partner.

  • Officers and Kellie's family will discuss the case on ITV’s Judge Rinder’s Crime Stories on Monday, January 7.

  • Anyone affected by domestic abuse in Hertfordshire can get guidance and support via the Herts Domestic Abuse Helpline 08 088 088 088. In an emergency situation, always call 999.

 

A ground-breaking domestic abuse conviction in Hertfordshire is to feature on ITV’s Judge Rinder’s Crime Stories on Monday, January 7.

Kellie Sutton took her own life in August 2017 aged 30, following months of physical and mental abuse from her partner.

Steven Gane, aged 32 and of Gadesden Close in Upminster, was found guilty of controlling and coercive behaviour, actual bodily harm and one charge of assault by beating. He was subsequently sentenced to four years and three months in prison.

The case was investigated by Hertfordshire Constabulary’s Domestic Abuse Investigation and Safeguarding Unit. Detective Inspector Sally Phillips and Detective Sergeant Andrea Dalton who worked on the case will appear on the programme discussing what is believed to be one of the first such posthumous convictions in the country.

It will also feature interviews with Kellie’s mother Pam Taylor and step-father Ian Last, who are both determined to raise awareness of the abuse that Kellie suffered.

During Kellie’s relationship with Gane, she changed from a positive, lively and extroverted character to being anxious, quiet, subdued and increasingly isolated from her friends. The episode aims to demonstrate how this can often be a sign that someone is in a controlling and coercive relationship.

DI Phillips said: “It was incredibly important for us to help tell Kellie’s story so that we can help victims and their families understand what coercive control is. It is not simply that they are a ‘bad boyfriend’ or ‘bad girlfriend’ and the abuse does not have to be physical. Coercive control can mean that the victim becomes isolated from support and deprived of their independence.

“Kellie’s mother has been determined from the very start to raise awareness of the type of abuse that Kellie suffered. She and the family have been so brave in being part of this campaign and hopefully the programme will help people to better understand what coercive control is and how to spot someone who might be a victim.”

Anyone affected by domestic abuse in Hertfordshire can get guidance and support via the Herts Domestic Abuse Helpline 08 088 088 088 or by visiting the Herts Sunflower website www.HertsSunflower.org. In an emergency situation, always call 999.

Kellie Sutton
Kellie Sutton
Photo credit: ITV
Photo credit: ITV

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