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Recognition for super sleuth school children

7 Mar 2018
  • School children become super sleuths.

  • Classroom becomes crime scene.

  • Chief Inspector commends top detective skills.

A group of young school children have received recognition for their top investigative skills after they successfully solved a mystery at their school.

The reception class at St Edmunds Primary School in Ware (age four and five) became super sleuths following a visit from their local neighbourhood officers PC Dave Miller & PCSO Emma Groves at the beginning of February. The officers were at the school to talk to the children about their work and staying safe.

PC Dave Wardell and his dogs Finn and Pearl were also present to talk about the work of the tri force dog unit.

After lunch the children returned to their classroom to find it had been ransacked and was now a crime scene. Due to his busy schedule Dave then left the children in charge of the investigation.

Unaware that the messy classroom was just a learning exercise set up by the teacher, the children set about gathering evidence, drawing exhibits and interviewing teachers. By the end of the afternoon they had successfully identified the offender and solved the crime.

“The exercise was an excellent way of getting the children to think about crime in an interesting, safe and educational way,” explained PC Dave Miller. “I often visit schools to talk to the children about a variety of issues and on this occasion was asked to help with an additional learning exercise.

“All of the children were involved and were very enthusiastic about finding the culprit and I hope they also picked up some useful skills in the process.”  

The children were presented with a special certificate from Chief Inspector for East Herts, Gerry McDonald, who made a special visit to the school last week. He said: “I was really impressed with the children. Their problem solving ability was excellent and very impressive for their age. It was great to meet them all today.”

Vicky Penfold, the reception class teacher added: “The children set about solving the mystery by making notes of the evidence they found. They measured footprints using blocks and gathered evidence. All evidence pointed to our Year 3 teacher. It turns out he had borrowed a book but made a terrible mess in the process! After an apology, the children let him off with a caution.”

Unaware that the messy classroom was just a learning exercise set up by the teacher, the children set about gathering evidence, drawing exhibits and interviewing teachers. By the end of the afternoon they had successfully identified the offender and solved the crime.

“The exercise was an excellent way of getting the children to think about crime in an interesting, safe and educational way,” explained PC Dave Miller. “I often visit schools to talk to the children about a variety of issues and on this occasion was asked to help with an additional learning exercise.

“All of the children were involved and were very enthusiastic about finding the culprit and I hope they also picked up some useful skills in the process.”  

Unaware that the messy classroom was just a learning exercise set up by the teacher, the children set about gathering evidence, drawing exhibits and interviewing teachers. By the end of the afternoon they had successfully identified the offender and solved the crime.

“The exercise was an excellent way of getting the children to think about crime in an interesting, safe and educational way,” explained PC Dave Miller. “I often visit schools to talk to the children about a variety of issues and on this occasion was asked to help with an additional learning exercise.

“All of the children were involved and were very enthusiastic about finding the culprit and I hope they also picked up some useful skills in the process.”  

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